As consumers across the country prepare for haunted Halloween fun, CPSC offers tips for selecting and creating safe costumes and home decorations.

“The trick to a safe Halloween celebration is to choose wisely from the start,” said CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum. “Make selections with safety in mind. Choose well-fitting costumes flame-resistant materials and the appropriate tools for decorating. The treat is keeping your family safe this holiday.”

Last year, more than 3,500 Halloween-related injuries were reported between October and November. Incidents involved burns, lacerations from pumpkin-carving, falls related to ill-fitting costumes, and injuries from collisions due to impaired vision.

Pumpkin carving was associated with the most Halloween-related injuries in 2011. Consumers should create a stable base and use the appropriate tools to prevent cuts and lacerations.

When selecting a costume, make sure it fits well, does not drag the ground, and is not too large or billowy. To prevent burns, the federal Flammable Fabrics Act (FFA) requires costumes sold at retail to be flame resistant. Consumers can create similar protection with homemade costumes by choosing synthetic fabrics that are inherently flame resistant, such as nylon and polyester.

Consumers are encouraged to prevent the potential of fires and burns caused by Halloween décor. Opt for flameless, battery-operated lights or glow sticks in jack-o-lanterns and other places where children can gain access. Burning candles should be kept away from combustible décor and places where they can be brushed against or knocked over.

CPSC recommends these additional safety tips to help make this year’s holiday safe:


  • Outside your home, use flameless candles or keep burning candles and jack-o’-lanterns away from landings and doorsteps, where trick-or-treaters’ costumes could brush against the flame.
  • Remove obstacles from lawns, steps, and porches when expecting trick-or-treaters.
  • When indoors, keep candles and jack-o’-lanterns away from curtains, other decorations, and other items that could ignite. Do not leave burning candles unattended.
  • Whether indoors or outside, use only decorative light strands that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory. Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Discard damaged sets.
  • Don’t overload extension cords.



  • When purchasing costumes, masks, beards, and wigs, look for flame-resistant fabrics, such as nylon or polyester; or look for the label “Flame Resistant.” Flame-resistant fabrics will resist burning and should extinguish quickly. To reduce the risk of contact with candles and other fire sources, avoid costumes made with flimsy materials and outfits with big, baggy sleeves, large capes, or billowing skirts.
  • Purchase or make costumes that are brightly colored and clearly visible to motorists.
  • For greater visibility during dusk and darkness, decorate or trim costumes and treat bags with reflective tape that will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights. Bags or sacks also should be brightly colored or decorated with reflective tape. Reflective tape is usually available in hardware, bicycle, and sporting goods stores.
  • Children should carry flashlights to be able to see and be seen.
  • To guard against trips and falls, costumes should fit well and not drag on the ground.
  • Children should wear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. High heels are not a good idea.
  • Tie hats and scarves securely to prevent them from slipping over children’s eyes and obstructing their vision.
  • If your child wears a mask, make sure it fits securely, provides adequate ventilation, and has holes large enough to allow full vision.
  • Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be made of soft, flexible material.



  • Children should not eat any treats before an adult has examined them carefully for evidence of tampering.
  • Carefully examine any toys or novelty items received by trick-or-treaters who are younger than 3 years of age. Do not allow young children to have any items that are small enough to present a choking hazard or that have small parts or components that could separate during use and present a choking hazard


The Gloucester Township Police Department acknowledges The Red Ribbon  campaign® is the oldest and largest drug prevention program in the nation, reaching millions of young people during Red Ribbon Week®, October 23rd – October 31st each year.
It is an ideal way for people and communities to unite and take a visible stand against drugs. Show your personal commitment to a drug-free lifestyle through the symbol of the Red Ribbon, October 23 – 31st.
The Red Ribbon Campaign® was started when drug traffickers in Mexico City murdered DEA agent Kiki Camarena in 1985. This began the continuing tradition of displaying Red Ribbons as a symbol of intolerance towards the use of drugs. The mission of the Red Ribbon Campaign® is to present a unified and visible commitment towards the creation of a DRUG – FREE AMERICA.

Take the National Red Ribbon Campaign Pledge now and be a part of the creation of a drug free America.

What’s the Pledge about?

  1. As parents and citizens, we will talk to our children and the children in our lives about the dangers of drug abuse.
  2. We will set clear rules for our children about not using drugs.
  3. We will set a good example for our children by not using illegal drugs or medicine without a prescription.
  4. We will monitor our children’s behavior and enforce appropriate consequences, so that our rules are respected.
  5. We will encourage family and friends to follow the same guidelines to keep children safe from substance abuse.

For more information visit us at and

Curfew Is at 7PM on October 29th and 30th and Recommended 8PM on October 31st

The Gloucester Township Police Community Relations Bureau wants to remind residents that curfew will be earlier on October 29, October 30th and October 31st due to Halloween. .

Curfew will be 7:00 PM on October 29th and 30th and recommended 8:00 PM on October 31st for any one under the age of 18 that is not accompanied by a parent, guardian or other adult person having custody, care or control of the juvenile.

Mischief Night Safety Tips:

1. Park your car in the garage and secure the vehicle and garage door.

2. Leave your house lights on, especially exterior lights.

3. Stay home on mischief night.

4. Lock up your valuables.

5. Put away children’s yard toys, they could be stolen or damaged.

6. Lock your car doors.

Please report any suspicious activity to the Gloucester Township Police Department by calling 228-4500 or if its an emergency, 911. If reporting suspicious activity please be as descriptive as possible. The description of the subject, location or direction of travel and tag on a motor vehicle is extremely helpful. Please do not put yourself in any danger.

If you have any questions you may contact the Gloucester Township Police Community Relations Bureau, Ptl. Jenn McLaughlin at or by calling 856-374-5735. If you need immediate assistance you may call 856-228-4500 or 9-1-1 for an emergency.


October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month which is an annual campaign to raise awareness about cybersecurity. We live in a world that is more connected than ever before. The Internet touches almost all aspects of everyone’s daily life, whether we realize it or not.

The Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign is a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. Cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. We each have to do our part to keep the Internet safe. When we all take simple steps to be safer online, it makes using the Internet a more secure experience for everyone.

Your usernames and passwords are not enough to keep your accounts secure.

Owning your online presence is actively managing your privacy and staying current with new ways to stay safe online such as using available tools – like privacy and security settings – to manage who sees the things you post online and with whom you share information

Keeping your Internet-connected devices free from malware and infections makes the Internet safer for you and more secure for everyone.


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